Brodie E. McKoy, MD

Fellow of the American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons
Sports Medicine
 

Image of Brodie E. McKoy

Patient Satisfaction Survey

Overall Satisfaction
4.8 out of 5
290 Ratings
Comments

Dr. McKoy is the Chairman of the Department of Surgery at East Cooper Medical Center. As a board certified and fellowship trained surgeon, he has extensive experience in all aspects of orthopedics with a particular interest in sports medicine and robotic assisted partial knee replacements known as Makoplasty. Dr. McKoy performs advanced arthroscopy of the hip, knee, and shoulder as well as total shoulder replacements and reverse shoulder replacements. 

Dr. McKoy was raised in South Carolina and earned his undergraduate degree from the College of Charleston and completed his medical school and orthopedic residency at MUSC. After completing a fellowship in sports medicine at the Hughston Clinic, he practiced orthopedics in Georgia before returning to Mount Pleasant to establish Southern Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with Dr. Billy Estes. Dr. McKoy has published numerous peer reviewed articles and book chapters. 

Dr. McKoy's greatest enjoyment comes from being with his family - his wife Kendall and their 6 beautiful children: Eden, Holland, Morey, Maggie, Boaz, and Jedidiah. His desire is to glorify the Lord by providing excellent orthopedic care to all of his patients. 

Patient Ratings & Comments

The Patient Rating score is an average of all responses to provider related questions on our independently administered Patient Satisfaction Survey. Responses are measured on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the best score.
4.9
Friendliness/courtesy of Care provider
4.8
Likelihood of recommending Care provider
4.8
Care provider efforts to include in decisions
4.8
Care provider explanations of prob/condition
4.9
Care provider concern for questions/worries
4.8
Patients' confidence in Care provider
4.8
Care provider spoke using clear language

Comments

Comments are gathered from our Patient Satisfaction Survey and displayed in their entirety. Patients are de-identified for confidentiality and patient privacy.